Amaranth Porridge (Powder not Grain)

£8.99£11.99

 

Amaranth known by many different names world wide, is of the Callaloo/ Spinach group, rich with nutrients mineral and vitamins.

The Aztec people, fed Amaranth to their children in this porridge form, to aid there growth and development, adults also drink it to sustain the nutrients needed for everyday life.

Direction for Use:

  1. Mix two heaped table spoon of flour in a little cold water to dissolve.
  2. Add half (1/2) a litre of hot water or desired milk as your base, bay leaves is optional and boil for 10 minutes.
  3.  if water is used as base, then add sweetner & or desired milk to taste. Add nutmeg,vanilla extract/essence, cinnamon, to acquire that unique flavour and taste, why not try coconut or desired milk as you base instead of water.
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Additional information

Weight 1.00 kg
Weight

1kg, 500g

Description

What Is Amaranth?
Scientifically known as Amaranthus, this is a genus of perennial plants (annual as well as short-lived). The name ‘amaranth’ is derived from the Greek words ‘amarantos’ (which means ‘unfading’) and ‘anthos’ (which means flower).
Technically, amaranth is a seed and not a grain (though most sources call it a grain, and that is okay). It is called ‘bayam’ in Indonesia and Malaysia, ‘kalunay’ in the Philippines, ‘amarante’ in France, ‘kiwicha’ in Spanish, ‘borlas’ in South America, and ‘bredo’ in Portugal. It also is called the African or the Indian spinach.
Certain amaranth species are cultivated as leaf vegetables, ornamental plants, and even pseudocereals (non-grasses used the same way as cereals, like quinoa). And there are different types of amaranth:
Amaranth leaves, which are either growing in the field (and come in vibrant colors like red, orange, and purple) or are ready for harvest (which are dried and brownish). These are also called amaranth greens.

What Is The History Of Amaranth?
Why do we call this interesting?
Because this is one of the oldest things cultivated and eaten by humans. Like, say, more than 8,000 years ago. The Aztecs were the first guys to cultivate this crop, and it is still a native crop in modern-day Peru. The ancient history of amaranth can be traced back to Mexico and the Yucatan Peninsula.
Today, amaranth is grown in Africa, India, Russia, China, throughout South America, and parts of North America.
The reason amaranth is being cultivated for more than 8,000 years now is the stuff it contains – the nutrients.

Direction for Use:

Mix two heaped table spoon of flour in a little cold water to dissolve.

Add half (1/2) a litre of hot water or desired milk as your base, bay leaves is optional and boil for 10 minutes.
if water is used as base, then add sweetner & or desired milk to taste. Add nutmeg,vanilla extract/essence, cinnamon, to acquire that unique flavour and taste, why not try coconut or desired milk as you base instead of water.

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